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9 Notes

These images of cities from space are not what they seem

These high-quality images may look like photographs of world cities taken from the International Space Station at night, but they are painstakingly constructed from public map data and finessed by artist Marc Khachfe.

Khachfe saw the stunning photographs of cities from space taken by astronauts on board the ISS and wanted to blow them up for his office wall. When he tried he found that they weren’t of high enough quality to work in large format, so he set about creating his own high-quality versions.

Khachfe finds Open Street Map data on roads, buildings, waterways and coastlines for each city, then uses his skills as a compositor to layer the information with CGI tricks to mimic the glow of streets and buildings.

He has tried to get New York right six times but has never been happy with the result -

“The building data is so vast that my machine struggles with it. If I try to cut corners, I’m not happy with the result. I’m a perfectionist.”

Khachfe is exhibiting at Raw London on 1 May.

Notes

San Francisco dashcam: a trip down market street, circa 1906

San Francisco’s main thoroughfare, Market Street, is a hive of activity in 1906, as can be seen in this dashcam footage from the time. The trip was filmed from the front of a cable car, and shows horse drawn and motorised traffic weaving between the cable cars & horse drawn trams, often narrowly missing pedestrians by mere inches.

The downtown area pictured here was all but destroyed by the infamous 1906 earthquake and subsequent fires.

Notes

The reality show
Schizophrenics used to see demons and spirits. Now they talk about actors and hidden cameras – and make a lot of sense.
How technology and modern entertainment has paralleled paranoia.
One to read.

The reality show

Schizophrenics used to see demons and spirits. Now they talk about actors and hidden cameras – and make a lot of sense.

How technology and modern entertainment has paralleled paranoia.

One to read.

9 Notes

Computer becomes first to pass Turing Test in artificial intelligence milestone
Eugene Goostman, a computer program pretending to be a young Ukrainian boy, successfully duped enough humans to pass the iconic test.
The Turing Test - which requires that computers are indistinguishable from humans - is considered a landmark in the development of artificial intelligence, but academics have warned that the technology could be used for cybercrime.
Computing pioneer Alan Turing said that a computer could be understood to be thinking if it passed the test, which requires that a computer dupes 30 per cent of human interrogators in five-minute text conversations.
Full story on The Independent.

Computer becomes first to pass Turing Test in artificial intelligence milestone

Eugene Goostman, a computer program pretending to be a young Ukrainian boy, successfully duped enough humans to pass the iconic test.

The Turing Test - which requires that computers are indistinguishable from humans - is considered a landmark in the development of artificial intelligence, but academics have warned that the technology could be used for cybercrime.

Computing pioneer Alan Turing said that a computer could be understood to be thinking if it passed the test, which requires that a computer dupes 30 per cent of human interrogators in five-minute text conversations.

Full story on The Independent.

Notes

Wikipedia mining algorithm reveals the most influential people in history
In 1978, the American researcher Michael Hart published The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History, a book that became an international best seller.
Since then, various others have published similar lists. But all suffer the same drawback: they are subjective and thus ultimately influenced by numerous cultural factors.
Now data scientists have come up with a way to extract an objective list of the 100 most influential people in history, using the network of links between biographical articles on Wikipedia and how they vary between 24 different language editions.
The researchers assume that people who are highly ranked in different language editions are influential across both language cultures and that the more appearances they make in different language editions, the more influential they are. But the actual ranking is done by PageRank-like algorithms that consider a biographical article important if it is pointed to by other important articles.
The resulting lists of the most influential men and women is a bit of a surprise: the top PageRanked individual is Carl Linnaeus, the 18th century Swedish botanist who developed the modern naming scheme for plants and animals.
Jesus takes second place.
The top PageRanked woman is Elizabeth II. Mary - mother of Jesus - takes second place.
For comparison, just under half of the top 100 most influential also appear in Hart’s 1978 book. But this is just the beginning. By counting the individuals from one culture that influence other cultures, the team is able to work out which cultures have dominated others. And by looking only at people born before certain dates, they can see how the influence of different cultures has waxed and waned throughout 35 centuries of recorded history.
Full story on Medium.

Wikipedia mining algorithm reveals the most influential people in history

In 1978, the American researcher Michael Hart published The 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History, a book that became an international best seller.

Since then, various others have published similar lists. But all suffer the same drawback: they are subjective and thus ultimately influenced by numerous cultural factors.

Now data scientists have come up with a way to extract an objective list of the 100 most influential people in history, using the network of links between biographical articles on Wikipedia and how they vary between 24 different language editions.

The researchers assume that people who are highly ranked in different language editions are influential across both language cultures and that the more appearances they make in different language editions, the more influential they are. But the actual ranking is done by PageRank-like algorithms that consider a biographical article important if it is pointed to by other important articles.

The resulting lists of the most influential men and women is a bit of a surprise: the top PageRanked individual is Carl Linnaeus, the 18th century Swedish botanist who developed the modern naming scheme for plants and animals.

Jesus takes second place.

The top PageRanked woman is Elizabeth II. Mary - mother of Jesus - takes second place.

For comparison, just under half of the top 100 most influential also appear in Hart’s 1978 book. But this is just the beginning. By counting the individuals from one culture that influence other cultures, the team is able to work out which cultures have dominated others. And by looking only at people born before certain dates, they can see how the influence of different cultures has waxed and waned throughout 35 centuries of recorded history.

Full story on Medium.

Notes

Google has received over 40,000 requests to “forget” personal information
In the three and bit weeks since a key ruling by the European Court of Justice about the right to be forgotten, Google has received over 40,000 requests to delete links to personal information from its search results (within 24 hours of putting the form online, Google had reportedly received 12,000+ deletion requests).
It should be noted that there is no absolute right to have information deleted, and Google will have to weigh a number of criteria in responding to the requests to delete links, including relevance of the information, and the time passed since the facts related.

Google has received over 40,000 requests to “forget” personal information

In the three and bit weeks since a key ruling by the European Court of Justice about the right to be forgotten, Google has received over 40,000 requests to delete links to personal information from its search results (within 24 hours of putting the form online, Google had reportedly received 12,000+ deletion requests).

It should be noted that there is no absolute right to have information deleted, and Google will have to weigh a number of criteria in responding to the requests to delete links, including relevance of the information, and the time passed since the facts related.

Notes

The future of space travel?

SpaceX has unveiled a seven-passenger space capsule designed for carrying astronauts to the International Station and other future destinations.

The Dragon V2 spacecraft looks like a sleek, modern-day version of the Apollo capsules that astronauts used in trips to the moon in the 1960s., but those capsules splashed down in the ocean and couldn’t be reused.

Astronaut Chris Hadfield says that for all its good points, the Dragon won’t eliminate the need for international cooperation in space -

"The United States cannot fly to the Space Station without Russia, and Russia can’t fly to the Space Station without the United States. It’s a wonderful thing to have. If you look at the whole life of the Space Station, think of all the tumult, with the fall of the Soviet Union, and the devaluation of the Ruble in 1998, and other countries backing out of it, the Columbia accident, which would have left us completely helpless if we hadn’t had the international commitment. It’s easy to have a one-month attention span, but that’s just not how you build spaceships, or how you explore the rest of the universe."

SpaceX builds its Dragon capsules and Falcon 9 rockets in a vast complex in Hawthorne, where fuselage sections for Boeing’s 747 jumbo jets once were built. The company is expanding its complex, near Los Angeles International Airport, and has more than 3,000 employees.

Notes

The future has arrived: solar panel roads
The future is now. An idea to replace our current roads and highways with high tech, energy sustainable solar panels has now raised over a million dollars on Indiegogo.
Imagine smart roadways that could fuel up to 3 x the amount of energy that’s currently being used in the United States? And roadways that could give warnings when an obstruction or animal is ahead, roadways that are resistant to snow and ice, and that even light up to create traffic patterns and configurations depending on flow.

Check it out.

The future has arrived: solar panel roads

The future is now. An idea to replace our current roads and highways with high tech, energy sustainable solar panels has now raised over a million dollars on Indiegogo.

Imagine smart roadways that could fuel up to 3 x the amount of energy that’s currently being used in the United States? And roadways that could give warnings when an obstruction or animal is ahead, roadways that are resistant to snow and ice, and that even light up to create traffic patterns and configurations depending on flow.

Check it out.

1 Notes

Scientists find method to reliably teleport data
Scientists at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience say they’ve managed to reliably teleport quantum information stored in one bit of diamond to another sitting three meters away (abstract, pre-print).
Their goal is to extend the range over a distance of a kilometer.
Reliability of quantum teleportation has been elusive. For example, in 2009, University of Maryland physicists demonstrated the transfer of quantum information, but only one of every 100 million attempts succeeded, meaning that transferring a single bit of quantum information required roughly 10 minutes. In contrast, the scientists at Delft have achieved the ability “deterministically”, meaning they can now teleport the quantum state of two entangled electrons accurately 100 percent of the time.
They did so by producing qubits using electrons trapped in diamonds at extremely low temperatures. According to Dr. Hanson, the diamonds effectively create ‘miniprisons’ in which the electrons were held. The researchers were able to establish a spin, or value, for electrons, and then read the value reliably.
No, I don’t really understand either. Still, Star Trek!

Scientists find method to reliably teleport data

Scientists at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience say they’ve managed to reliably teleport quantum information stored in one bit of diamond to another sitting three meters away (abstract, pre-print).

Their goal is to extend the range over a distance of a kilometer.

Reliability of quantum teleportation has been elusive. For example, in 2009, University of Maryland physicists demonstrated the transfer of quantum information, but only one of every 100 million attempts succeeded, meaning that transferring a single bit of quantum information required roughly 10 minutes. In contrast, the scientists at Delft have achieved the ability “deterministically”, meaning they can now teleport the quantum state of two entangled electrons accurately 100 percent of the time.

They did so by producing qubits using electrons trapped in diamonds at extremely low temperatures. According to Dr. Hanson, the diamonds effectively create ‘miniprisons’ in which the electrons were held. The researchers were able to establish a spin, or value, for electrons, and then read the value reliably.

No, I don’t really understand either. Still, Star Trek!

1 Notes

You are what you’re tricked into eating
Two prominent nutrition experts have put forth the theory that the current obesity epidemic is in large part the result of processed foods tricking our appetite control mechanisms.
They argue that evolution has given humans a delicately balanced system that balances appetite with metabolic needs, and that processed foods trick that system by making foods high in fats and carbohydrates that have the gustatory qualities of proteins.
As the researchers put it, “many people eat far too much fat and carbohydrate in their attempt to consume enough protein”.
Full article on Nature.

You are what you’re tricked into eating

Two prominent nutrition experts have put forth the theory that the current obesity epidemic is in large part the result of processed foods tricking our appetite control mechanisms.

They argue that evolution has given humans a delicately balanced system that balances appetite with metabolic needs, and that processed foods trick that system by making foods high in fats and carbohydrates that have the gustatory qualities of proteins.

As the researchers put it, “many people eat far too much fat and carbohydrate in their attempt to consume enough protein”.

Full article on Nature.

1 Notes

The big bumper toolkit for HAPPY LIVING
'Modern Life is Rubbish'. Arguably Blur's best album, but not an entirely accurate sentiment – modern life is actually pretty spiffy. However, there are certain key elements of it that you need to get properly locked down in order for it all to function satisfactorily, and for this reason we've compiled for you the Big Bumper Toolkit for Happy Living. Y'know, just to help out.
Here’s what you need to do or acquire to ensure that everything is lovely -
1. Quality bedding
Never underestimate the importance of having a decent kip. Being asleep is pretty much the best thing you can do. So don’t balk at the cost of decent bedding, it’s worth every penny. Take £200 to John Lewis and buy an all-seasons duck-down duvet (unless you’re allergic to feathers, obviously – then it’d be a really stupid idea); while you’re there, another £50-odd on Egyptian cotton sheets will help. Yeah, it’s annoyingly expensive, but just trust me. Best money you’ll ever spend. Thank me tomorrow.
2. Chargers
Your life will be infinitely less annoying if you make sure you’ve got enough phone chargers.
Get one to live beside your bed, another for the living room or kitchen, one for the car, and one for your desk drawer at work. Then you won’t be that annoying person who’s always bitching about low battery and scrounging for leads, and you also won’t do that frustrating thing where you get into bed, realise your battery’s on 7% and your charger’s downstairs, and have to trek all the way down to get it.
And don’t believe that crap about your device being harmed by non-branded generic chargers, it’s just a bridge between your power socket and your battery. Buy Chinese 99p chargers from eBay. What can go wrong*?!
*Please don’t send me a bill if your phone catches fire
3. A good television
I don’t know about you, but I spend a fair bit of time watching telly. It pays to get a good one. Even if you do end up blowing more money than you can comfortably afford right now, the cost-per-view will shrink every time you switch it on; buying quality will mean it lasts for years, as well as giving better sound and picture. And it gives you an excuse to watch TV constantly, using that whole cost-per-view thing as justification.
Please, please don’t just go to Tesco and buy a Technika (or other shit brand you’ve never heard of) – yes, it’s very cheap, but you get what you pay for. It’ll be awful, and you’ll have to replace it next year.
4. Decent wi-fi
C’mon, it’s 2014. Fast internet access is readily available. If your provider can’t provide, swap to someone who can. Time spent waiting for pages to load is dead time you’ll never get back.
5. Tactile glassware
Some people end up with a cupboard full of random mismatched glasses that they’ve acquired over the years from a variety of sources. These people are doing it wrong.
If you’re having a beer, pour it into a pint glass (and don’t pour an ale into a lager glass, the agitator in the base will fizz it up and ruin it). Get some nice wine glasses. Buy a set of chunky tumblers with heavy bases for your spirits. It’ll feel right. Little luxuries, they make a big difference.
6. Buy new socks every now and then
It might just be me, but I reckon the whole rigmarole of getting dressed in the morning is massively improved by having socks that you like. I mean, getting dressed is very little effort, but the fact that you’ve had to get up at all makes the whole thing annoying. But nice socks make it OK. Yeah? Comfy socks, soft ones, with attractive stripes or interesting patterns. I spent years in the wilderness wearing cheap black socks, and I’m pretty sure my life is better now.
7. Make sure everyone fucks off and leaves you alone
Register with the Telephone Preference Service. This should, in theory, ensure that you never received unsolicited marketing calls on your landline (you still will, that’s just life, but now you have an amazing weapon in your arsenal that makes the bastards hang up immediately).
Stop mindlessly deleting all of those crap emails that keep popping into your inbox and actually bother to open them and click ‘unsubscribe’ - your new-found inbox cleanliness will make your heart smile.
Oh, and disconnect your doorbell. No-one of any interest will ever ring it out of the blue, and if it’s somebody you know then they’ll definitely call you and say “yo, I’m at the front door…”
8. Get spares
Set aside a drawer in your house. Fill it with the following -
AA batteries. Light bulbs of various wattages and fittings. AAA batteries. Plasters. Germolene. Bonjela. Sellotape. Menus for your favourite local takeaways. Two screwdrivers (one flathead, one Phillips). A torch. A biro. Some string. Paracetamol, ibuprofen, Immodium. A tape measure.
Call this your useful drawer. It’ll save all sorts of where-the-fuck-is-that-ism.
-
Unfortunately most of these suggestions involve buying something, and they’re not all cheap things either.
Sorry about that.
But then if you had your life in order, maybe you’d have sorted some of this shit out already. You can’t blame me for that.
JuicyPips, direct from the mind of @denialvibes, is published weekly.

The big bumper toolkit for HAPPY LIVING

'Modern Life is Rubbish'. Arguably Blur's best album, but not an entirely accurate sentiment – modern life is actually pretty spiffy. However, there are certain key elements of it that you need to get properly locked down in order for it all to function satisfactorily, and for this reason we've compiled for you the Big Bumper Toolkit for Happy Living. Y'know, just to help out.

Here’s what you need to do or acquire to ensure that everything is lovely -

1. Quality bedding

Never underestimate the importance of having a decent kip. Being asleep is pretty much the best thing you can do. So don’t balk at the cost of decent bedding, it’s worth every penny. Take £200 to John Lewis and buy an all-seasons duck-down duvet (unless you’re allergic to feathers, obviously – then it’d be a really stupid idea); while you’re there, another £50-odd on Egyptian cotton sheets will help. Yeah, it’s annoyingly expensive, but just trust me. Best money you’ll ever spend. Thank me tomorrow.

2. Chargers

Your life will be infinitely less annoying if you make sure you’ve got enough phone chargers.

Get one to live beside your bed, another for the living room or kitchen, one for the car, and one for your desk drawer at work. Then you won’t be that annoying person who’s always bitching about low battery and scrounging for leads, and you also won’t do that frustrating thing where you get into bed, realise your battery’s on 7% and your charger’s downstairs, and have to trek all the way down to get it.

And don’t believe that crap about your device being harmed by non-branded generic chargers, it’s just a bridge between your power socket and your battery. Buy Chinese 99p chargers from eBay. What can go wrong*?!

*Please don’t send me a bill if your phone catches fire

3. A good television

I don’t know about you, but I spend a fair bit of time watching telly. It pays to get a good one. Even if you do end up blowing more money than you can comfortably afford right now, the cost-per-view will shrink every time you switch it on; buying quality will mean it lasts for years, as well as giving better sound and picture. And it gives you an excuse to watch TV constantly, using that whole cost-per-view thing as justification.

Please, please don’t just go to Tesco and buy a Technika (or other shit brand you’ve never heard of) – yes, it’s very cheap, but you get what you pay for. It’ll be awful, and you’ll have to replace it next year.

4. Decent wi-fi

C’mon, it’s 2014. Fast internet access is readily available. If your provider can’t provide, swap to someone who can. Time spent waiting for pages to load is dead time you’ll never get back.

5. Tactile glassware

Some people end up with a cupboard full of random mismatched glasses that they’ve acquired over the years from a variety of sources. These people are doing it wrong.

If you’re having a beer, pour it into a pint glass (and don’t pour an ale into a lager glass, the agitator in the base will fizz it up and ruin it). Get some nice wine glasses. Buy a set of chunky tumblers with heavy bases for your spirits. It’ll feel right. Little luxuries, they make a big difference.

6. Buy new socks every now and then

It might just be me, but I reckon the whole rigmarole of getting dressed in the morning is massively improved by having socks that you like. I mean, getting dressed is very little effort, but the fact that you’ve had to get up at all makes the whole thing annoying. But nice socks make it OK. Yeah? Comfy socks, soft ones, with attractive stripes or interesting patterns. I spent years in the wilderness wearing cheap black socks, and I’m pretty sure my life is better now.

7. Make sure everyone fucks off and leaves you alone

Register with the Telephone Preference Service. This should, in theory, ensure that you never received unsolicited marketing calls on your landline (you still will, that’s just life, but now you have an amazing weapon in your arsenal that makes the bastards hang up immediately).

Stop mindlessly deleting all of those crap emails that keep popping into your inbox and actually bother to open them and click ‘unsubscribe’ - your new-found inbox cleanliness will make your heart smile.

Oh, and disconnect your doorbell. No-one of any interest will ever ring it out of the blue, and if it’s somebody you know then they’ll definitely call you and say “yo, I’m at the front door…”

8. Get spares

Set aside a drawer in your house. Fill it with the following -

AA batteries. Light bulbs of various wattages and fittings. AAA batteries. Plasters. Germolene. Bonjela. Sellotape. Menus for your favourite local takeaways. Two screwdrivers (one flathead, one Phillips). A torch. A biro. Some string. Paracetamol, ibuprofen, Immodium. A tape measure.

Call this your useful drawer. It’ll save all sorts of where-the-fuck-is-that-ism.

-

Unfortunately most of these suggestions involve buying something, and they’re not all cheap things either.

Sorry about that.

But then if you had your life in order, maybe you’d have sorted some of this shit out already. You can’t blame me for that.

JuicyPips, direct from the mind of @denialvibes, is published weekly.

Notes

Elevate good times

Modern society strives to be more efficient each day. We want to be better connected, uninterrupted, lighter and faster in every single aspect of our lives. It’s not surprising then that a development in the elevator industry recently made headlines when Hitachi announced that this stunning new skyscraper in Guangzhou, China would house the world’s fastest elevator, boasting ascending speeds of up to 45 miles per hour.

By 2016, Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre will be rocketing it’s residents and guests up to the 95th floor in 43 seconds, 15 miles per hour above the speed allowed on New York City streets.

The developers insist that the experience won’t be unpleasant or dangerous thanks to serious advances made in air pressure technology and a device called ‘Governor’ that prevents excessive speeds and lateral vibrations.

The first ever commercial Elevator was introduced in 1857 and rose at a measly 40-feet per minute or around 0.45mph, making Hitachi’s latest contraption 100 times the speed. Can we expect to be ascending at 4500mph by 2171? Lets hope not.

@Mingard is a regular contributor to Found Things.

1 Notes

This rolling, transforming droid is the stuff of nightmares

So, this is how it starts. You hear a crunch, crunch, crunch—the sound of an imperfectly-round plastic ball rolling over concrete, chasing you down an alley. You look back and you see this… thing. It was a sphere a few seconds ago, but now is an ambling, walking machine of death. The top opens like a flower, or like a nuclear launch silo, whatever simile you prefer. In any case, the MorpHex is a robot that looks like it’s straight out of your (my?) nightmares…

Via Motherboard.

Notes

An experiment in finance: investing in chance
I’ve been reading a lot about the propensity of the human mind to mistake random events for controlled experience of late. I’ve also dabbled in the stock market on and off over the years, directly managing my own portfolio alongside investing in various managed funds. What has struck me the most about this experience is the complete lack of predicable consistency or patten when it comes to the stock market.
It was Taleb Nassim who first brought the random nature of the markets to my attention back in 2008. His book, Fooled by Randomness, succinctly explains the central role of chance in life: more precisely, how we perceive luck in our personal and professional experiences.
It is only because we fail to understand probability that we continue to believe events are non-random, finding reasons where none exist.
Given that my own portfolio and those funds that I have invested in rarely top a return of 6% or so, I figured why not test out Nassim’s thesis?
So I put together a very basic stock picker. Literally just three lines of PHP designed to pick a single listed company at random from the LSE.
Here it is -

<?php
$f_contents = file(“lse.txt”); 
$line = $f_contents[rand(0, count($f_contents) - 1)];
echo $line;

You can download the file as a .zip, including lse.txt here.
For the purposes of this experiment I’ve invested £250 in ten randomly picked companies, £2,500 in total. I intend to maintain each of these holdings for a single month, at which point I will sell the five worst performing stocks and will then buy five more randomly selected stocks. I’ll repeat this for at least three months, possibly longer, and will be reporting the findings here.
Round #1
JPMORGAN GBL EMERG MKTS INC TST PLC (JEMI)
FALKLAND OIL & GAS (FOGL)
JOHNSTON PRESS (JPR)
TRINITY EXPLORATION & PRODUCTION (TRIN)
IFG GROUP (IFP)
BEOWULF MINING (BEM)
WOLF MINERALS listed (WLFE)
FITBUG HLDGS PLC (FITB)
CANACCORD GENUITY GROUP INC (CF.)
DALATA HOTEL GROUP PLC (DAL)

Wish me luck!

An experiment in finance: investing in chance

I’ve been reading a lot about the propensity of the human mind to mistake random events for controlled experience of late. I’ve also dabbled in the stock market on and off over the years, directly managing my own portfolio alongside investing in various managed funds. What has struck me the most about this experience is the complete lack of predicable consistency or patten when it comes to the stock market.

It was Taleb Nassim who first brought the random nature of the markets to my attention back in 2008. His book, Fooled by Randomness, succinctly explains the central role of chance in life: more precisely, how we perceive luck in our personal and professional experiences.

It is only because we fail to understand probability that we continue to believe events are non-random, finding reasons where none exist.

Given that my own portfolio and those funds that I have invested in rarely top a return of 6% or so, I figured why not test out Nassim’s thesis?

So I put together a very basic stock picker. Literally just three lines of PHP designed to pick a single listed company at random from the LSE.

Here it is -

<?php

$f_contents = file(“lse.txt”); 

$line = $f_contents[rand(0, count($f_contents) - 1)];

echo $line;

You can download the file as a .zip, including lse.txt here.

For the purposes of this experiment I’ve invested £250 in ten randomly picked companies, £2,500 in total. I intend to maintain each of these holdings for a single month, at which point I will sell the five worst performing stocks and will then buy five more randomly selected stocks. I’ll repeat this for at least three months, possibly longer, and will be reporting the findings here.

Round #1

  • JPMORGAN GBL EMERG MKTS INC TST PLC (JEMI)
  • FALKLAND OIL & GAS (FOGL)
  • JOHNSTON PRESS (JPR)
  • TRINITY EXPLORATION & PRODUCTION (TRIN)
  • IFG GROUP (IFP)
  • BEOWULF MINING (BEM)
  • WOLF MINERALS listed (WLFE)
  • FITBUG HLDGS PLC (FITB)
  • CANACCORD GENUITY GROUP INC (CF.)
  • DALATA HOTEL GROUP PLC (DAL)

Wish me luck!

2 Notes

Joss Whedon releases his latest film on demand
Joss Whedon has taken the film world by surprise by releasing his latest film for download on the same day that it premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.
'In Your Eyes' comes from Whedon&#8217;s own &#8220;micro studio&#8221;, Bellwether Pictures, and is featured on Vimeo as a $5 rental, (free trailer).

"It&#8217;s exciting for us because we get to explore yet another new form of distribution — and we get $5."
- Joss Whedon

Whedon has a history of pushing the delivery envelope, as with Dr. Horrible&#8217;s Sing-Along Blog, in 2008 (which if you&#8217;ve not seen, you should).

Joss Whedon releases his latest film on demand

Joss Whedon has taken the film world by surprise by releasing his latest film for download on the same day that it premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.

'In Your Eyes' comes from Whedon’s own “micro studio”, Bellwether Pictures, and is featured on Vimeo as a $5 rental, (free trailer).

"It’s exciting for us because we get to explore yet another new form of distribution — and we get $5."

- Joss Whedon

Whedon has a history of pushing the delivery envelope, as with Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog, in 2008 (which if you’ve not seen, you should).