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Posts tagged Art

3 Notes

Face painting taken to another level
You’re probably wondering what is so impressive about someone covering his face in paint.
All is not as it seems. You might not think it when looking at the first few of these pictures, but what you’re looking at is actually one of the most incredible things we’ve seen in a long time.




Yep, those previous pictures were not photos of a man with paint on his face, but they were actually incredible hyperrealistic oil paintings (of a man with paint on his face).
This is the work of Spanish painter Eloy Morales. Eloy is one of the best hyperrealistic painters in the world. Not only are his paintings photographic in quality, but they possess a vibrancy and life that tricks the viewer into thinking they are actually looking at photographs.
Here’s a video of Morales explaining his art -

You can see more on the artists site.
@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

Face painting taken to another level

You’re probably wondering what is so impressive about someone covering his face in paint.

All is not as it seems. You might not think it when looking at the first few of these pictures, but what you’re looking at is actually one of the most incredible things we’ve seen in a long time.

Yep, those previous pictures were not photos of a man with paint on his face, but they were actually incredible hyperrealistic oil paintings (of a man with paint on his face).

This is the work of Spanish painter Eloy Morales. Eloy is one of the best hyperrealistic painters in the world. Not only are his paintings photographic in quality, but they possess a vibrancy and life that tricks the viewer into thinking they are actually looking at photographs.

Here’s a video of Morales explaining his art -

You can see more on the artists site.

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

8 Notes

Listen to a recording of a song written on a man’s butt in a 15th century Hieronymus Bosch painting

From the you couldn’t make it department -

Last week, the Internet became all excited when an enterprising blogger named Amelia transcribed, recorded, and uploaded a musical score straight out of Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights, painted between 1490 and 1510.

The kicker? Amelia found the score written on a suffering sinner’s butt.

Via @openculture.

39 Notes

Tiny Lego photographer - Legographer - travels the world in 365 days

Photographer Andrew Whyte has documented the adventures of a lone Lego photographer in his series The Legographer.

Whyte carries the Legographer with him wherever he goes and when he finds a good location, snaps a picture of him in action with his Iphone 4S.

“The Legographer” was part of a 365-day project, which seems to be more and more popular among the artistically-inclined these days. Whyte pledged to create an image a day for a year, and this is the reason why he chose to use a smart phone to create the images (using his more expensive camera equipment would have made taking those everyday photos far more time-consuming and far less convenient).

“The spontaneity of Legography contrasts hugely with my other specialism of shooting long exposures at night.

"I had fun immersing myself in the adventures & occasional mishaps of a mini figure photographer.“

- Whyte

A 365-day pledge, by the way, is a great idea for anyone who is determined to nurture their creative side…

1 Notes

Challenging architectural norms: artist imagines the same building in Munich configured 88 different ways

As part of his latest project NHDK, photographer Víctor Enrich challenged himself to digitally reconfigure the same building in Munich in 88 different configurations.

NHDK from victor enrich on Vimeo.

The Barcelona-based artist is known for his warped and skewed interpretations of architecture in locations around the world, including an extensive series of images shot in Tel Aviv back in 2010.

All of the photos are available as prints which you can pickup on his website.

Notes

3D print show, 2014

In a decade that has seen 3D printing go from the pastime of rich hobbyists to a technology that sparked debate about ethics behind home printed weaponry, what better time to showcase some of the more beautiful examples of what can be achieved when artist meets innovative technology.

Last week the Metropolitan Pavilion in New York played host to the 2014 3D print show, hosted by Adobe and Shapeways where 18 artists from around the world displayed sculptures and installations created entirely with 3D printers.

From the intricate architecture of Serge Ecker to the intriguing forms of Joshua Harker, the exhibition showcases some of the most fascinating media artefacts to come out of this young, fresh art form.

We may not be at the point of affordable accessible home printing, but these thought provoking pieces may just inspire you to break the bank and get creating.

You can check out all of the artists here.

@Mingard is a regular contributor to Found Things.

6 Notes

Not what you’d expect: inside Wieden + Kennedy’s Portland garage

There is so much inspiration hidden inside the W+K garage. From a collection of large-format Faile pieces to a secret basement lab hidden behind a door marked 'Storage Six AC4', this is where the old school messiness of letter pressing and screen printing happen!

Full gallery on NOTCOT.

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

Notes

The best science and engineering visualisations of last year
Science and art don’t intersect nearly as often as they should, despite their many similarities.
Chief among those shared qualities is creativity - whether of thought, experimentation, or presentation.
When science and art do meet one other, the results can be an astonishing blend of expression and fact.
Each year, Wired reports on the winners of the International Science & Engineering Visualisation Challenge, a competition run by the journal Science and the U.S. National Science Foundation.
There were more than 200 entries in 2013, a fraction of which I recall seeing at the time…
@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

The best science and engineering visualisations of last year

Science and art don’t intersect nearly as often as they should, despite their many similarities.

Chief among those shared qualities is creativity - whether of thought, experimentation, or presentation.

When science and art do meet one other, the results can be an astonishing blend of expression and fact.

Each year, Wired reports on the winners of the International Science & Engineering Visualisation Challenge, a competition run by the journal Science and the U.S. National Science Foundation.

There were more than 200 entries in 2013, a fraction of which I recall seeing at the time…

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

3 Notes

Tate Britain to let visitors view art at night using remote-controlled robots

It’s always been a notoriously difficult task - getting your digital audience into the physical space of an art gallery without the restrictions that come with fixed position cameras. In recent years, Google have offered some lucky few galleries the opportunity of featuring on Street View but without regular and expensive updates, these featured venues quickly become out of date in Google’s software.

So Whats next? Our friends at Tate Britain think they have the answer, and it comes in the form of remote controlled robots. Yes. Robots.

As the lights go out and the skeleton security staff take their positions, they’ll soon be joined by an army of wheeled electronic friends courtesy of the “After Dark” project; the result of this years IK Prize. Equipped with small torches and due to get a lot of online attention, the £60,000 project is set to be up and running this summer.

@Mingard is a regular contributor to Found Things.

6 Notes

A modern interpretation of Picasso’s Tête de taureau? Vintage bike parts converted into functional taxidermic-racks

Vienna-based designer Andreas Scheiger created this fun series of faux taxidermy heads using a bunch of found bicycle seats and handlebars.

The pieces can serve as Objet d’art, or as functional hooks for holding bags, coats, and even other bicycles.

Several of them are for sale on the artists site. And you can find out more about how he makes them here.

Via Fubiz.

6 Notes

This incredible sculpture was made from 4,000 pieces of hammered scrap metal

Created from nearly 4,000 pieces of metal scraps, Aslan - Turkish for Lion - is a recent sculpture by Istanbul-based artist Selçuk Yılmaz.

The piece took nearly a year of work and involved the hand-cutting and hammering of each individual metal piece, with the final work weighing around 550 pounds.

You can see much more of the artists work on Behance.

1 Notes

A Better Tomorrow

“A Better Tomorrow” by Justin Plakas is a continuing series of images that combine both physical and digital manipulations, and that weave in and out of the past, present and future.

The series started as collage-based sketches and over time an entire world emerged, a world that uses language and symbols that we are familiar with, but that evokes a sense of secrecy, mystery and anxiety.

Plakas is a multi-media artist living and working in Las Vegas. He received a BA from the University of Maryland Baltimore County with a specialization in Film/Video and his MFA in Photography from the Lamar Dodd School of Art at The University of Georgia. He has just begun a stint at the Bemis Center for Contemporary art in Omaha, Nebraska, as part of the international Artist-in-Residence program.

You can see much more on the artists site.

1 Notes

Face painting? Yeah… kicked up a notch or ten

There’s a good reason we see more paintings of faces than paintings on faces: The face is not a good canvas.

That’s what makes these photos by Moscow photographer Alexander Khoklov so impressive. They collapse three dimensions into two and defy the eye to discern whether what it’s seeing is really a photo.

Very cool and very, very clever.

Full story on Wired.

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

2 Notes

The subversive, surreal paintings of Paco Pomet

Artist Paco Pomet possesses a wonderfully bizarre sense of humour that manifests itself through his work as surreal and often humorous visual twists.

His subverted landscapes and portraits often borrow from sepia-toned photographs that look like historical documents or vintage vacation photos. There is a parallel to traditional western art, mixed with a monochrome effect that restates the documentary character of the original piece.

Pomet, who lives and works in Grenada, Spain, opened his second solo show, Scapelands, at Richard Heller Gallery in mid January.

You can see more on the artists site.

5 Notes

Incredible stained glass windows made from laser cut paper

Inspired by Gothic and Islamic architecture, artist Eric Standley constructs intricate stained glass windows from sheets of laser cut paper.

His most recent work, Either Or Arch 5.1 (top), is made from over 100 sheets alone.

There’s not really too much one can say about this other than to Gaze with Amaze-ment!

You can see much more on the artists site.

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things. Found via laughing squid

7 Notes

Zaria Forman’s drawings of Greenland

In August 2012 Zaria Forman led an Arctic art expedition called Chasing the Light aboard the Wanderbird up the NW coast of Greenland.

It was the second expedition to this area whose mission was to create art inspired by the dramatic geography. The first was in 1869, led by the American painter William Bradford.

Her work from the expedition, “Chasing the Light in Greenland, documents climate change through art -

"In a deeper sense, this series addresses the concept of saying goodbye on both a personal and global level. 

"My mother, Rena Bass Forman, had conceived the idea for the voyage, but sadly did not live to see it through.

"My hope is that these drawings bring awareness, and invite viewers to share the urgency in a hopeful and meaningful way. Art can facilitate a deeper understanding of any crisis, helping us find meaning and optimism in shifting landscapes."

- Zaria Forman

You can much more on the artists site.