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Posts tagged Life

2 Notes

When you are popular on Facebook, strangers think you’re attractive
From psychology, we’ve known for a while that people create near-instant impressions of people based upon all sorts of cues. Visual cues (like unkempt hair or clothing), auditory cues (like a high- or low-pitched voice), and even olfactory cues (what’s that smell!?!) all combine rapidly to create our initial impressions of a person.
Where things get interesting is when one set of these cues is eliminated. For example, if we’ve never met a person in a real life, do we form impressions of people when all we know about them is their Facebook profile? And if so, what do we learn from those profiles?
As it turns out, it can be quite a lot.
Graham G Scott has experimentally examined the impact of viewer gender, Facebook profile gender and number of Facebook friends on impression formation, finding that people with lots of friends appear more socially attractive, more physically attractive, more approachable, and more extroverted.
When viewing modified Facebook profiles (all with the same profile picture and an experimentally controlled number of friends), people rated profiles with lots of Facebook friends as more physically attractive, more socially attractive, more approachable, and more extroverted.
Since potential employers look at Facebook profiles these days, perhaps it’s time to hire some Facebook friends.
Full article in Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (PDF).

When you are popular on Facebook, strangers think you’re attractive

From psychology, we’ve known for a while that people create near-instant impressions of people based upon all sorts of cues. Visual cues (like unkempt hair or clothing), auditory cues (like a high- or low-pitched voice), and even olfactory cues (what’s that smell!?!) all combine rapidly to create our initial impressions of a person.

Where things get interesting is when one set of these cues is eliminated. For example, if we’ve never met a person in a real life, do we form impressions of people when all we know about them is their Facebook profile? And if so, what do we learn from those profiles?

As it turns out, it can be quite a lot.

Graham G Scott has experimentally examined the impact of viewer gender, Facebook profile gender and number of Facebook friends on impression formation, finding that people with lots of friends appear more socially attractive, more physically attractive, more approachable, and more extroverted.

When viewing modified Facebook profiles (all with the same profile picture and an experimentally controlled number of friends), people rated profiles with lots of Facebook friends as more physically attractive, more socially attractive, more approachable, and more extroverted.

Since potential employers look at Facebook profiles these days, perhaps it’s time to hire some Facebook friends.

Full article in Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication (PDF).

1 Notes

Your ancestors didn’t sleep like you: the myth of the eight-hour sleep
Following on from our article on the incredible importance of sleep for habits & motivation a few weeks ago, here’s some fascinating insight into sleeping habits pre-1800, from Roger Ekirch, professor of History at Virginia Tech -
Ekirch’s has found that we didn’t always sleep in one eight hour chunk; we used to sleep in two shorter periods, over a longer range of night. This range was about 12 hours long, and began with a sleep of three to four hours, wakefulness of two to three hours, then sleep again until morning.
References are scattered throughout literature, court documents, personal papers, and the ephemera of the past. What is surprising is not that people slept in two sessions, but that the concept was so incredibly common. Two-piece sleeping was the standard, accepted way to sleep.

"It’s not just the number of references – it is the way they refer to it, as if it was common knowledge."

An English doctor wrote, for example, that the ideal time for study and contemplation was between “first sleep” and “second sleep”. Chaucer tells of a character in the Canterbury Tales that goes to bed following her “firste sleep.” And, explaining the reason why working class conceived more children, a doctor from the 1500s reported that they typically had sex after their first sleep.
Ekirch’s book “At Day’s Close: Night in Times Past” is replete with such examples.
But just what did people do with these extra twilight hours? Pretty much what you might expect.
Most stayed in their beds and bedrooms, sometimes reading, and often they would use the time to pray. Religious manuals included special prayers to be said in the mid-sleep hours.
Others might smoke, talk with co-sleepers, or have sex. Some were more active and would leave to visit with neighbours.
As we know, this practice eventually died out. Ekirch attributes the change to the advent of street lighting and eventually electric indoor light, as well as the popularity of coffee houses. Author Craig Koslofsky offers a further theory in his book Evening’s Empire. With the rise of more street lighting, night stopped being the domain of criminals and sub-classes and became a time for work or socializing. Two sleeps were eventually considered a wasteful way to spend these hours.
No matter why the change happened, shortly after the turn of the 20th century the concept of two sleeps had vanished from common knowledge.
Full article on the BBC.
@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

Your ancestors didn’t sleep like you: the myth of the eight-hour sleep

Following on from our article on the incredible importance of sleep for habits & motivation a few weeks ago, here’s some fascinating insight into sleeping habits pre-1800, from Roger Ekirch, professor of History at Virginia Tech -

Ekirch’s has found that we didn’t always sleep in one eight hour chunk; we used to sleep in two shorter periods, over a longer range of night. This range was about 12 hours long, and began with a sleep of three to four hours, wakefulness of two to three hours, then sleep again until morning.

References are scattered throughout literature, court documents, personal papers, and the ephemera of the past. What is surprising is not that people slept in two sessions, but that the concept was so incredibly common. Two-piece sleeping was the standard, accepted way to sleep.

"It’s not just the number of references – it is the way they refer to it, as if it was common knowledge."

An English doctor wrote, for example, that the ideal time for study and contemplation was between “first sleep” and “second sleep”. Chaucer tells of a character in the Canterbury Tales that goes to bed following her “firste sleep.” And, explaining the reason why working class conceived more children, a doctor from the 1500s reported that they typically had sex after their first sleep.

Ekirch’s book “At Day’s Close: Night in Times Past” is replete with such examples.

But just what did people do with these extra twilight hours? Pretty much what you might expect.

Most stayed in their beds and bedrooms, sometimes reading, and often they would use the time to pray. Religious manuals included special prayers to be said in the mid-sleep hours.

Others might smoke, talk with co-sleepers, or have sex. Some were more active and would leave to visit with neighbours.

As we know, this practice eventually died out. Ekirch attributes the change to the advent of street lighting and eventually electric indoor light, as well as the popularity of coffee houses. Author Craig Koslofsky offers a further theory in his book Evening’s Empire. With the rise of more street lighting, night stopped being the domain of criminals and sub-classes and became a time for work or socializing. Two sleeps were eventually considered a wasteful way to spend these hours.

No matter why the change happened, shortly after the turn of the 20th century the concept of two sleeps had vanished from common knowledge.

Full article on the BBC.

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

11 Notes

A star is born
If a tree falls in an Alpine forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? What happens when a star – a real one – is born in an Alpine forest? We all ought to start thinking about the latter because that’s exactly what scientists are doing in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance: they are creating a star in a bottle.
Thirty-five countries, representing more than half the world’s population, have invested billions of dollars into building a star-making machine. Few engineering feats can compare in scale, technical complexity or ambition.
Once completed, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, or ITER as this mammoth machine is called, will stand a hundred feet tall and weigh twenty-three thousand tons – that’s more than twice the weight of the Eiffel Tower.
If ever switched on, ITER will create a new energy source that could save the planet from catastrophe -

"Beams of uncharged particles - the energy in them so great it could vaporise a car in seconds - will pour into the chamber, adding tremendous heat. In this way, the circulating hydrogen will become ionised, and achieve temperatures exceeding two hundred million degrees Celsius - more than ten times as hot as the sun at its blazing core."

And it gets better according to The New Yorker -

"There isn’t a physical substance that could contain such a thing. Metals, plastics, ceramics, concrete, even pure diamond - all would be obliterated on contact, and so the machine will hold the superheated cloud in a ‘magnetic bottle’.
"Just feet from the reactor’s core, the magnets will be cooled to two hundred and sixty-nine degrees below zero, nearly the temperature of deep space. Caught in the grip of their titanic forces, the artificial earthbound sun will be suspended, under tremendous pressure, in the pristine nothingness of ITER’s vacuum interior."

Eventually, physicists hope commercial reactors modelled on ITER will be built too – generating terawatts of power with no carbon, virtually no pollution, and scant radioactive waste which would essentially solve the world’s energy problems for the next thirty million years…
Perhaps there is light at the end of the tunnel after all?
Full report by @raffiwriter on The New Yorker.
@sallyhandroo is a regular contributor to Found Things.

A star is born

If a tree falls in an Alpine forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? What happens when a star – a real one – is born in an Alpine forest? We all ought to start thinking about the latter because that’s exactly what scientists are doing in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance: they are creating a star in a bottle.

Thirty-five countries, representing more than half the world’s population, have invested billions of dollars into building a star-making machine. Few engineering feats can compare in scale, technical complexity or ambition.

Once completed, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, or ITER as this mammoth machine is called, will stand a hundred feet tall and weigh twenty-three thousand tons – that’s more than twice the weight of the Eiffel Tower.

If ever switched on, ITER will create a new energy source that could save the planet from catastrophe -

"Beams of uncharged particles - the energy in them so great it could vaporise a car in seconds - will pour into the chamber, adding tremendous heat. In this way, the circulating hydrogen will become ionised, and achieve temperatures exceeding two hundred million degrees Celsius - more than ten times as hot as the sun at its blazing core."

And it gets better according to The New Yorker -

"There isn’t a physical substance that could contain such a thing. Metals, plastics, ceramics, concrete, even pure diamond - all would be obliterated on contact, and so the machine will hold the superheated cloud in a ‘magnetic bottle’.

"Just feet from the reactor’s core, the magnets will be cooled to two hundred and sixty-nine degrees below zero, nearly the temperature of deep space. Caught in the grip of their titanic forces, the artificial earthbound sun will be suspended, under tremendous pressure, in the pristine nothingness of ITER’s vacuum interior."

Eventually, physicists hope commercial reactors modelled on ITER will be built too – generating terawatts of power with no carbon, virtually no pollution, and scant radioactive waste which would essentially solve the world’s energy problems for the next thirty million years…

Perhaps there is light at the end of the tunnel after all?

Full report by @raffiwriter on The New Yorker.

@sallyhandroo is a regular contributor to Found Things.

1 Notes

An amazing village designed just for people with dementia

Depending on your family history you may or may not wonder what will happen to you when your memory fades. The unlucky members of society may be facing the inevitability of hereditary forms of Dementia and be wondering what will happen when it gets too tough for loved ones to cope with alone. For many of us, the thought of being ‘homed’ with others in a similar situation offers little appeal and we’re likely to fight for home care and support from our loved ones.

Research from the Alzheimer Association shows that one in three seniors will actually die with dementia, most likely in a confused situation and without around-the-clock care. So what can we do to ease the transition and inevitable need for dependance without the clinical confusing environment of a care home?  In the small town of Weesp in Holland, our Dutch friends believe they have a radical solution, and they’re trailing it now.

De Hogeweyk or ‘Dementia village’ is self-contained world for sufferers of the disease and it comes packed with real-world facilities that aim to feed the requirements of all patients. Instead of appointed care workers in stark uniforms, the village aims to seamlessly integrate care into the ecosystem as members of society allowing residence to go about their lives, blissfully unaware that they are receiving the care they need from their peers.

Whilst the scheme is still experimental, results look promising and Dutch architect Molenaar & Bol Van Dillen hope to be working on more sites soon in America and Europe and a similar concept in Switzerland has culminated in a development that mimics life in the 1950s.

@Mingard is a regular contributor to Found Things.

Notes

The incredible importance of sleep for habits & motivation
For a long time, I underestimated the importance of sleep.
Sure, I know that sleep is important for health and happiness and all of that… but it wasn’t until I learned two things that sleep took on a new importance for me -
If you don’t get enough sleep, you will fail at changing habits; and
If you have a lack of sleep, your motivation will drop tremendously.
For years I focused on waking early so that I’d be more productive and be able to focus on my morning habits. But those two things were harmed by a lack of sleep.
I could cite a bunch of studies and numbers, but here’s the honest truth: based on my own self-experiments, and working with thousands of people on habits, sleep is one of the most important but least valued factors when it comes to creating habits.
And in my own life, I’ve noticed that when sleep levels drop, my productivity drops. My motivation to work on hard projects drops.
Here’s what happens -
I stay up late but still try to get up early, and so I’m in a bit of a sleep deficit
Unfortunately, I stay up late the next night, but still get up early the following morning, and the sleep deficit grows
This continues until I’m really tired and just not motivated to do anything
This lack of motivation drops my discipline levels, so that my healthy habits get forgotten. All I care about is how crappy I feel, and how to comfort my bad feelings
Whatever project and/or habits I’ve been working on get dropped. I feel worse
This pattern continues until I get enough sleep. It takes a day or two to get back to where I should be.
I still do this from time to time, but I’ve learned this pattern the hard way from so many repetitions that I’m much better at getting sufficient sleep these days. And I’ve gotten better at recognising the signals that I’m not getting enough sleep, soon enough that I can remedy the problem sooner.
How to Get Better Sleep
I’m not an expert on sleep, but here’s what I find to work for me -
Go to bed earlier. I like to wake up fairly early (not the crazy early hours of my past), but if I don’t go to sleep earlier, then waking early is a mistake
Sleep in if I don’t go to bed early enough
Have a bedtime routine. I don’t always follow my routine, but when I do, I sleep much better. Basically, it involves flossing, brushing my teeth, cleaning up, shutting down my computer/phone, and then reading
Meditate. I lie down with my eyes closed, and meditate, focusing on my body and breath. If I’m tired, this never fails to put me to sleep
If for some reason those things don’t work, I use this method (walk myself through my memories of the day in detail) to finally fall into the gentle embrace of sleep.
If you find yourself lacking motivation or having trouble changing any habits, check your sleep levels. It could be the factor that’s holding you back.
Contributed by Leo Babauta.

The incredible importance of sleep for habits & motivation

For a long time, I underestimated the importance of sleep.

Sure, I know that sleep is important for health and happiness and all of that… but it wasn’t until I learned two things that sleep took on a new importance for me -

  1. If you don’t get enough sleep, you will fail at changing habits; and
  2. If you have a lack of sleep, your motivation will drop tremendously.

For years I focused on waking early so that I’d be more productive and be able to focus on my morning habits. But those two things were harmed by a lack of sleep.

I could cite a bunch of studies and numbers, but here’s the honest truth: based on my own self-experiments, and working with thousands of people on habits, sleep is one of the most important but least valued factors when it comes to creating habits.

And in my own life, I’ve noticed that when sleep levels drop, my productivity drops. My motivation to work on hard projects drops.

Here’s what happens -

  • I stay up late but still try to get up early, and so I’m in a bit of a sleep deficit
  • Unfortunately, I stay up late the next night, but still get up early the following morning, and the sleep deficit grows
  • This continues until I’m really tired and just not motivated to do anything
  • This lack of motivation drops my discipline levels, so that my healthy habits get forgotten. All I care about is how crappy I feel, and how to comfort my bad feelings
  • Whatever project and/or habits I’ve been working on get dropped. I feel worse

This pattern continues until I get enough sleep. It takes a day or two to get back to where I should be.

I still do this from time to time, but I’ve learned this pattern the hard way from so many repetitions that I’m much better at getting sufficient sleep these days. And I’ve gotten better at recognising the signals that I’m not getting enough sleep, soon enough that I can remedy the problem sooner.

How to Get Better Sleep

I’m not an expert on sleep, but here’s what I find to work for me -

  • Go to bed earlier. I like to wake up fairly early (not the crazy early hours of my past), but if I don’t go to sleep earlier, then waking early is a mistake
  • Sleep in if I don’t go to bed early enough
  • Have a bedtime routine. I don’t always follow my routine, but when I do, I sleep much better. Basically, it involves flossing, brushing my teeth, cleaning up, shutting down my computer/phone, and then reading
  • Meditate. I lie down with my eyes closed, and meditate, focusing on my body and breath. If I’m tired, this never fails to put me to sleep

If for some reason those things don’t work, I use this method (walk myself through my memories of the day in detail) to finally fall into the gentle embrace of sleep.

If you find yourself lacking motivation or having trouble changing any habits, check your sleep levels. It could be the factor that’s holding you back.

Contributed by Leo Babauta.

4 Notes

Your 60-hour work week is not a badge of honour
We’ve all had to deal with long, tough work weeks, whether it’s working over the weekend to meet a project deadline, pulling all-nighters to resolve a crisis, or the steady accretion of overtime in a death march.
It’s fairly common in the tech sector for employees to hold these tough weeks up as points of pride; something good they achieved or survived.
Jeff Archibald thinks that this is the wrong way to think of it. And he’s right.

"If you’re working 60 hours a week, something has broken down organisationally. You are doing two people’s jobs. You aren’t telling your boss you’re overworked (or maybe he/she doesn’t care). You are probably a pinch point, a bottleneck. You are far less productive. You are frantically swimming against the current, just trying to keep your head above water.
"We need to stop being proud of overworking ourselves."

Worth a read.

Your 60-hour work week is not a badge of honour

We’ve all had to deal with long, tough work weeks, whether it’s working over the weekend to meet a project deadline, pulling all-nighters to resolve a crisis, or the steady accretion of overtime in a death march.

It’s fairly common in the tech sector for employees to hold these tough weeks up as points of pride; something good they achieved or survived.

Jeff Archibald thinks that this is the wrong way to think of it. And he’s right.

"If you’re working 60 hours a week, something has broken down organisationally. You are doing two people’s jobs. You aren’t telling your boss you’re overworked (or maybe he/she doesn’t care). You are probably a pinch point, a bottleneck. You are far less productive. You are frantically swimming against the current, just trying to keep your head above water.

"We need to stop being proud of overworking ourselves."

Worth a read.

7 Notes

A method to find balance
Despite the insipid title of this post, work-life balance is a bit of a myth.
Sure, we work too much, don’t have time for all the other things we want to do, are always tired, eat convenience food or comfort food rather than nutritious or nourishing food, never have time for solitude… but that’s the life we want, right?
OK, maybe it needs a bit of readjusting. Work and life and learning and relationships and health are all really the same thing, and so “balance” is perhaps the wrong word. But adjusting our lives to our aspired priorities is not a bad thing.
A friend recently asked me how I balance my personal lives and all my projects, and it made me pause and think. And that pause, and the thinking, is really the key to it all, I discovered.
So here’s the method I use -
Pause regularly. In our lives, we are so busy and caught up in what we’re doing that we have no space for thinking. I build regular pauses into my life, so that I have some space for thought. What kind of pauses? I use morning meditation, drinking coffee in the morning with my notebook, my morning shower, a walk alone, tea or a run or other meeting with my wife or a friend, as space for thinking about my life. Pause regularly to create space.
Zoom out. When you take a pause, zoom out from the close-up view, so you can look at the big picture. What are you doing with your life? What kind of person do you want to be? Are you making decisions in the aggregate? What are your priorities? And are you living those priorities? You don’t need to think about all of these things during each pause, but use the pauses for this kind of thinking.
Readjust. When you notice that you’ve been spending too much time on the computer, and too little with your kids or other loved ones, make a note of it. When you notice that some important projects are being neglected, or you don’t have time for exercise, or your diet has gone to hell and settled in there, make a note. Think about what adjustments you can make.
Now actually block off time. Making a note and mental adjustment is great, but it’s meaningless without action. What kind of action can you take to adjust how you actually spend your time? Make a commitment, on your calendar. Not one that you’ll skip when the time comes and you’re browsing your favourite sites. A commitment you’ll keep. For example, if you want to work out more, make a regular date with a friend to go for a run or do a bodyweight workout in the park or go to yoga class or go to the gym you signed up for 11 months ago and never use. Make a regular date. If you want to work on a project, make an appointment to go to a tea house or library for 3-4 hours just to work on that project. Or commit to a whole week of working on your novel. Tell somebody about it, and better yet commit to getting them the work by the end of the week (or whatever period you choose). Make the time, solidly.
That’s the method. Four steps, done regularly.
Life is a constant readjustment. It’s whether you readjust consciously that makes all the difference.
Article by Leo Babauta.

A method to find balance

Despite the insipid title of this post, work-life balance is a bit of a myth.

Sure, we work too much, don’t have time for all the other things we want to do, are always tired, eat convenience food or comfort food rather than nutritious or nourishing food, never have time for solitude… but that’s the life we want, right?

OK, maybe it needs a bit of readjusting. Work and life and learning and relationships and health are all really the same thing, and so “balance” is perhaps the wrong word. But adjusting our lives to our aspired priorities is not a bad thing.

A friend recently asked me how I balance my personal lives and all my projects, and it made me pause and think. And that pause, and the thinking, is really the key to it all, I discovered.

So here’s the method I use -

  1. Pause regularly. In our lives, we are so busy and caught up in what we’re doing that we have no space for thinking. I build regular pauses into my life, so that I have some space for thought. What kind of pauses? I use morning meditation, drinking coffee in the morning with my notebook, my morning shower, a walk alone, tea or a run or other meeting with my wife or a friend, as space for thinking about my life. Pause regularly to create space.
  2. Zoom out. When you take a pause, zoom out from the close-up view, so you can look at the big picture. What are you doing with your life? What kind of person do you want to be? Are you making decisions in the aggregate? What are your priorities? And are you living those priorities? You don’t need to think about all of these things during each pause, but use the pauses for this kind of thinking.
  3. Readjust. When you notice that you’ve been spending too much time on the computer, and too little with your kids or other loved ones, make a note of it. When you notice that some important projects are being neglected, or you don’t have time for exercise, or your diet has gone to hell and settled in there, make a note. Think about what adjustments you can make.
  4. Now actually block off time. Making a note and mental adjustment is great, but it’s meaningless without action. What kind of action can you take to adjust how you actually spend your time? Make a commitment, on your calendar. Not one that you’ll skip when the time comes and you’re browsing your favourite sites. A commitment you’ll keep. For example, if you want to work out more, make a regular date with a friend to go for a run or do a bodyweight workout in the park or go to yoga class or go to the gym you signed up for 11 months ago and never use. Make a regular date. If you want to work on a project, make an appointment to go to a tea house or library for 3-4 hours just to work on that project. Or commit to a whole week of working on your novel. Tell somebody about it, and better yet commit to getting them the work by the end of the week (or whatever period you choose). Make the time, solidly.

That’s the method. Four steps, done regularly.

Life is a constant readjustment. It’s whether you readjust consciously that makes all the difference.

Article by Leo Babauta.

1 Notes

There is a microscopically thin line between being brilliantly creative and acting like the most gigantic idiot on earth. So what the hell, leap.

4 Notes

"Why can’t I try on different lives, like dresses, to see which fits best and is more becoming?"
- Sylvia Plath

"Why can’t I try on different lives, like dresses, to see which fits best and is more becoming?"

- Sylvia Plath

Notes

Screwing up on purpose: the beauty of the deliberate mistake

We don€’t know our boundaries if we never test them.

4 Notes

Step away from your gadgets!
Two years ago, when the iPhone and iPad were spiking in popularity, when I dined with other technology bloggers and reporters we enthusiastically passed our phones around the table, showing off the latest app or funny YouTube clip.
Now, even as our gadgets can hold more apps and stream faster videos, when I’m at dinner with technologists we play a new game. Attendees happily place their smartphones in a stack in the middle of the table, and the first person who touches his or her phone before the meal is over has to pay the bill.
Rather than being enslaved by your machines, it’s important to maintain a healthy distance. And to step away completely from time to time.
Worth a read.

Step away from your gadgets!

Two years ago, when the iPhone and iPad were spiking in popularity, when I dined with other technology bloggers and reporters we enthusiastically passed our phones around the table, showing off the latest app or funny YouTube clip.

Now, even as our gadgets can hold more apps and stream faster videos, when I’m at dinner with technologists we play a new game. Attendees happily place their smartphones in a stack in the middle of the table, and the first person who touches his or her phone before the meal is over has to pay the bill.

Rather than being enslaved by your machines, it’s important to maintain a healthy distance. And to step away completely from time to time.

Worth a read.

1 Notes

How to walk away: the psychology of lost causes
Most of us know what it’s like to stay in a job or a relationship after it’s stopped being satisfying, or to take on a project that’s too big and be reluctant to admit it. CEOs have been known to allocate manpower and money to projects long after it becomes clear that they are failing. Think of JP Morgan’s “London Whale” Bruno Iksil, who doubled down on a losing bet rather than admit his losses and ultimately cost the bank over six billion dollars. Similarly there was John Edwards, who couldn’t bring himself to end his losing bid for the presidency even after his mistress became pregnant.
The costs to a person who does not know when to quit can be enormous. In economics it’s known as sunk cost fallacy, though the costs are more than financial. While we recognize the fallacy almost immediately in others, it’s harder to see in ourselves. Why?
Full article on the Atlantic.

How to walk away: the psychology of lost causes

Most of us know what it’s like to stay in a job or a relationship after it’s stopped being satisfying, or to take on a project that’s too big and be reluctant to admit it. CEOs have been known to allocate manpower and money to projects long after it becomes clear that they are failing. Think of JP Morgan’s “London Whale” Bruno Iksil, who doubled down on a losing bet rather than admit his losses and ultimately cost the bank over six billion dollars. Similarly there was John Edwards, who couldn’t bring himself to end his losing bid for the presidency even after his mistress became pregnant.

The costs to a person who does not know when to quit can be enormous. In economics it’s known as sunk cost fallacy, though the costs are more than financial. While we recognize the fallacy almost immediately in others, it’s harder to see in ourselves. Why?

Full article on the Atlantic.

Notes

The Perfect 7-Step Plan To Boost Daily Productivity.

The Perfect 7-Step Plan To Boost Daily Productivity.

1 Notes

Notes

When an interesting person is momentarily not-interesting, I wait patiently. When a perfect organization…is imperfect, I get annoyed. Because perfect has to be perfect all the time.
Perfect vs. interesting. (via @huey)