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Posts tagged Photography

5 Notes

Stunning ‘time-slice’ photos capture global landmarks from sunrise to sunset

Photographer Richard Silver spends his time touring the world’s most famous landmarks, shooting images from the most tranquil hour of sunrise to the dying moments of sunset. In his ongoing photo series, Time Sliced, he sets out to capture the fleeting beauty of day-to-night transitions, splicing 36 photos from throughout the day together to form a single image.

Silver shoots with a Nikon D800 and tripod. He spends only a day or two at a location. He shoots just as the sun rises and then again from the same spot 45 minutes before sunset, just as the sky turns to deep blue. He doesn’t, as often assumed, take his photos throughout the whole day -

"people have misquoted me! I would say I work for about one hour and a half from start to finish."

Silver’s photographs only work when the weather cooperates with him. His photos are the product of a somewhat collaborative effort, where nature has an equal stake in how things turn out.

"As a photographer and traveler, the only thing that can ruin my day is rain! On light cloudy days there’s no colour change so I can’t do the slicing"

Silver is nostalgic for a time when photographs were more than pixels on a screen -

"Computers and monitors give a totally different texture to photography, it’s not the same. The goal is to print my images for people."

He argues the tangibility of the printed photo, with its potential matte and glossy finishes, add an additional dimension to the viewing experience. Whether or not you think he is right about that, his work stands on it’s own merit, on screen or in print.

1 Notes

The great Glastonbury clean up

Festival goers head home as volunteers begin the massive task of clearing up after 180,000 people at Glastonbury festival…

Full gallery on The Guardian.

2 Notes

Never before seen photographs from WWI

From the bizarre to the sobering: never before seen photographs from WWI have been released from a private collection.

More on The Telegraph.

4 Notes

GoPro, circa 1960
We have it so easy today. Back in the day, you just tied your cameraman right to the car -

F1 driver Jackie Stewart wore this stills-only proto-GoPro at the Monaco Grand Prix in 1966 (though not during the actual race) -

Stewart is also the chap in the photo at the head of this post. For some reason neither of his contraptions are recognised by Wikipedia as being the first documented helmet cam, which is instead attributed to a motorcycle race in 1986 -

Here’s another early use of a helmet cam, this time from the world of skydiving, circa 1961 -

GoPro, circa 1960

We have it so easy today. Back in the day, you just tied your cameraman right to the car -

F1 driver Jackie Stewart wore this stills-only proto-GoPro at the Monaco Grand Prix in 1966 (though not during the actual race) -

Stewart is also the chap in the photo at the head of this post. For some reason neither of his contraptions are recognised by Wikipedia as being the first documented helmet cam, which is instead attributed to a motorcycle race in 1986 -

Here’s another early use of a helmet cam, this time from the world of skydiving, circa 1961 -

9 Notes

These images of cities from space are not what they seem

These high-quality images may look like photographs of world cities taken from the International Space Station at night, but they are painstakingly constructed from public map data and finessed by artist Marc Khachfe.

Khachfe saw the stunning photographs of cities from space taken by astronauts on board the ISS and wanted to blow them up for his office wall. When he tried he found that they weren’t of high enough quality to work in large format, so he set about creating his own high-quality versions.

Khachfe finds Open Street Map data on roads, buildings, waterways and coastlines for each city, then uses his skills as a compositor to layer the information with CGI tricks to mimic the glow of streets and buildings.

He has tried to get New York right six times but has never been happy with the result -

“The building data is so vast that my machine struggles with it. If I try to cut corners, I’m not happy with the result. I’m a perfectionist.”

Khachfe is exhibiting at Raw London on 1 May.

2 Notes

Kissing sailor dies
There have been many iconic images from WWII, some capturing the unimaginable triumphs that gave us hope, and others, the tremendous losses that tarnished the world in its darkest hour.
A particular image however, takes us to the moment the war ended and the reaction one emotional young man has. The beautiful photograph captures Glenn McDuffie, an 18 year old soldier who, on exiting New York subway station and hearing the news grabs a young nurse for this spectacular kiss.
The photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt never asked for the names of the two embracing service workers and the identities remained unknown until 1980, when now deceased Los Angeles schoolteacher Edith Shain reached out to Life magazine as the unidentified nurse.
Many soldiers came forward but it wasn’t until 2007 that a forensic specialist confirmed McDuffies account.
86 year old semi-professional basketball player and long serving mail carrier Glenn McDuffie will be buried at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery.
@Mingard is a regular contributor to Found Things.

Kissing sailor dies

There have been many iconic images from WWII, some capturing the unimaginable triumphs that gave us hope, and others, the tremendous losses that tarnished the world in its darkest hour.

A particular image however, takes us to the moment the war ended and the reaction one emotional young man has. The beautiful photograph captures Glenn McDuffie, an 18 year old soldier who, on exiting New York subway station and hearing the news grabs a young nurse for this spectacular kiss.

The photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt never asked for the names of the two embracing service workers and the identities remained unknown until 1980, when now deceased Los Angeles schoolteacher Edith Shain reached out to Life magazine as the unidentified nurse.

Many soldiers came forward but it wasn’t until 2007 that a forensic specialist confirmed McDuffies account.

86 year old semi-professional basketball player and long serving mail carrier Glenn McDuffie will be buried at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery.

@Mingard is a regular contributor to Found Things.

7 Notes

The secret life of miniature Batman

They say that real boys don’t grow up; their toys just get bigger. Well that’s not the case for everyone.

Take French photographer Rémi Noël, who’s been tripping throughout the state of Texas together with a miniature plastic Batman figurine as his only companion.

Noël has long been fascinated by the image of “timeless America” captured in the works of Jack Kerouac, Edward Hopper and Robert Frank. So Texas’s endless highways and neon-sign motels were the perfect setting for lonely Batman’s photo shoot.

"It’s a toy that I stole from my son one day when I was cleaning his room

“Since I go to the United States by myself, I take Batman with me to feel less alone. And I take him out – I set him up in scenarios.”

The caped crusader looks rather alienated from his usual 24/7 villain-beating self. Nostalgic gazes out the window and cravings for “Ranch Style” beans create that feeling of longing we’ve all experienced.

You can see more on the photographer’s site.

2 Notes

New York through eyes of a bicycle

Photographer Tim Sklyarov gives you a different view of New York - through the lens of a GoPro mounted on the handlebars of his bicycle.  His biggest hazard? Not the traffic, but pedestrians. And, we imagine, his bobble-hatted companion…

@paulrgn is a regular contributor to Found Things.

39 Notes

Tiny Lego photographer - Legographer - travels the world in 365 days

Photographer Andrew Whyte has documented the adventures of a lone Lego photographer in his series The Legographer.

Whyte carries the Legographer with him wherever he goes and when he finds a good location, snaps a picture of him in action with his Iphone 4S.

“The Legographer” was part of a 365-day project, which seems to be more and more popular among the artistically-inclined these days. Whyte pledged to create an image a day for a year, and this is the reason why he chose to use a smart phone to create the images (using his more expensive camera equipment would have made taking those everyday photos far more time-consuming and far less convenient).

“The spontaneity of Legography contrasts hugely with my other specialism of shooting long exposures at night.

"I had fun immersing myself in the adventures & occasional mishaps of a mini figure photographer.“

- Whyte

A 365-day pledge, by the way, is a great idea for anyone who is determined to nurture their creative side…

1 Notes

Full-body 3D scan and print

Snap sculpture: DoubleMe3D makes personally commissioned sculptures, 10-17cm high, printed from 3D scans undertaken in their studio.

The process requires three minutes of sitting still. Materials include plastic, sandstone, aluminium, ceramics, bronze, silver or gold, and single colours (full-colour is planned).

I like how the process requires time being still, much like photography of old. Imagine where we’ll be in 10 years…

@ColonyClive is a regular contributor to Found Things.

1 Notes

I wore a tiny gadget that took a photo of what I was doing every 30 seconds
The Narrative Clip is a plastic square that’s bigger than a quarter but smaller than a book of matches. There’s a metal clip on the back for attaching it to things and it houses a 5-megapixel camera that takes a picture every 30 seconds. Tap it with your finger twice to take a picture manually.
Dylan Love wore one in order to review it for Business Insider -

"It’s fun to be able to look back through the Narrative app and know exactly where you were at 1:13 PM last Tuesday, or how funny-looking that guy from the subway was this morning.
"The negative aspects of the Narrative are mostly social. People will notice it on your clothes and ask about it, which puts you in the awkward position of explaining that you’re secretly photographing everything that’s going on."

You can read his review here.

I wore a tiny gadget that took a photo of what I was doing every 30 seconds

The Narrative Clip is a plastic square that’s bigger than a quarter but smaller than a book of matches. There’s a metal clip on the back for attaching it to things and it houses a 5-megapixel camera that takes a picture every 30 seconds. Tap it with your finger twice to take a picture manually.

Dylan Love wore one in order to review it for Business Insider -

"It’s fun to be able to look back through the Narrative app and know exactly where you were at 1:13 PM last Tuesday, or how funny-looking that guy from the subway was this morning.

"The negative aspects of the Narrative are mostly social. People will notice it on your clothes and ask about it, which puts you in the awkward position of explaining that you’re secretly photographing everything that’s going on."

You can read his review here.

1 Notes

How do you identify bees?

Sam Droege is the head of the USGS Native Bee Inventory and Monitoring Program in Maryland, an organisation that monitors the health and habitat of bees in the U.S. as well as creating archival reference catalogs that aid researchers in the identification of bee species in North America.

The project is no small task as there are literally thousands of bee species in the U.S., many of which vary in only the most minute of ways.

To aid in the identification process the USGS Bee Inventory relies on extremely high resolution photography, an initiative led by Droege that has been ongoing since 2010.

Droege’s macro photos of bees are so clear and well executed that they practically pass as works of art in their own right.

He shares with Flickr -

“When we started looking at these pictures, I just wanted to gaze at these shots for long periods of time.

”I had seen these insects for many years, but the level of detail was incredible. The fact that everything was focused, the beauty and the arrangement of the insects themselves - the ratios of the eyes, the golden means, the french curves of the body, and the colours that would slide very naturally from one shade to another were just beautiful!

"It was the kind of thing that we could not achieve at the highest level of art.”

You can see much more on Flickr.

2 Notes

Photographer shares unusual view of twin towers before 9/11
It was a photo that anyone might have taken. In the years leading to Sept. 11, 2001, Americans took to the skies like never before, numbering in the millions, taking in the bird’s-eye view above the clouds.
Katie Weisberger, a freshman in the photography program at New York University, was flying back from her home in Richmond, Virginia. She had a Nikon 35 mm film camera at the ready when the twin towers came into view.

"It was very early morning, and I just remember it being really beautiful, watching the sun rise and taking photographs.
"I had no idea I took that photo. It was on the negative."
That photo — developed at a drugstore or photo lab — was a horizon shot, layers of blue sky streaked with a barely perceptible reddish haze and oceans of roiling clouds that submerged all of New York except for the twin towers.
Full story on Yahoo News.

Photographer shares unusual view of twin towers before 9/11

It was a photo that anyone might have taken. In the years leading to Sept. 11, 2001, Americans took to the skies like never before, numbering in the millions, taking in the bird’s-eye view above the clouds.

Katie Weisberger, a freshman in the photography program at New York University, was flying back from her home in Richmond, Virginia. She had a Nikon 35 mm film camera at the ready when the twin towers came into view.

"It was very early morning, and I just remember it being really beautiful, watching the sun rise and taking photographs.

"I had no idea I took that photo. It was on the negative."

That photo — developed at a drugstore or photo lab — was a horizon shot, layers of blue sky streaked with a barely perceptible reddish haze and oceans of roiling clouds that submerged all of New York except for the twin towers.

Full story on Yahoo News.

Notes

A ladder into space

These other-worldy pictures taken from a construction site high above the Shanghai skyline are breathtakingly unbelievable.

It’s one thing seeing skyscrapers peek out through the city fog beneath you but with a pair of human feet in view it really adds some stomach-churning context.

A group of Russian adventurers travelled to China to climb the Shanghai Tower while still under construction – and, by the looks of the video, it was a daredevil visit unauthorised by the Chinese authorities. Remarkable. Like a modern day version of the film Man on Wire, arguably with even more balls…

@paulrgn is a regular contributor to Found Things

2 Notes

Tilt-shifting space to create galaxies in miniature

With the use of a relatively simple photography technique, Italian artist Haari Tesla has reduced the cosmos to a microscopic level.

Her series, Illuminated Code From Space, is an experimentation in tilt-shift manipulation. By digitally adjusting the depth of field, contrast, and adding a gradient, Tesla has managed to transform photographs of nebulae, galaxies, and supernovae into microorganisms.

It’s incredible to look at these images knowing that they are actually photographs of some of the largest places we know, rather than of something so small that it can’t be seen with the naked eye.

The initial idea for the series came from the Greek Neo-Platonic schema of macrocosm and microcosm: the recognition that the same traits appear in entities of many different sizes.

Plato wrote about how we see these patterns reproduced in all levels, from the largest scale (macrocosm, or the universe) all the way down to a microscopic level (also know as microcosm).

After viewing other tilt-shift photography, Tesla decided to try it for herself by using publicly distributed images of space. She’s interested in the intersection of art and science, and combines them here in a spectacular way.

Via Peanut Butter.