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Posts tagged Writing

29 Notes

This radio journalist learnt how to structure his stories by sketching the models used by other shows

Bradley Campbell says drawing story structure is like using Google Maps for directions. Structure offers a path, a way to figure out where to go… what to do with all the tape.

To help him plan out his stories, Bradley thinks pictorially. He makes story structure drawings in his head. And he first learned about structure in a bar. On a napkin.

Worth a read.

4 Notes

"Why can’t I try on different lives, like dresses, to see which fits best and is more becoming?"
- Sylvia Plath

"Why can’t I try on different lives, like dresses, to see which fits best and is more becoming?"

- Sylvia Plath

4092 Notes

Modern nomad
With a nearly desperate sense of isolation and a growing suspicion that I lived in an alien land, I took to the road in search of places where change did not mean ruin and where time and men and deeds connected.
― William Heat Moon, Blue Highways
Via stn-to-stn

Modern nomad

With a nearly desperate sense of isolation and a growing suspicion that I lived in an alien land, I took to the road in search of places where change did not mean ruin and where time and men and deeds connected.

― William Heat Moon, Blue Highways

Via stn-to-stn

Notes

I’ve studied and acted Much Ado, but only really came to appreciate it’s quality and depth of meaning watching Joss Whedon’s version.
If you’re in need of something to do this rainy Saturday, head to the cinema. You won’t regret it.
muchadomovie.com

I’ve studied and acted Much Ado, but only really came to appreciate it’s quality and depth of meaning watching Joss Whedon’s version.

If you’re in need of something to do this rainy Saturday, head to the cinema. You won’t regret it.

muchadomovie.com

2 Notes

@google wishes Maurice Sendak a happy 85th birthday via its search homepage bit.ly/18nEfkc #lovely
Via @robfields

@google wishes Maurice Sendak a happy 85th birthday via its search homepage bit.ly/18nEfkc #lovely

Via @robfields

Notes

22 Notes

When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.
C. S. Lewis

2 Notes

Letter’s of note: people simply empty out
In 1969, publisher John Martin offered to pay Charles Bukowski $100 each and every month for the rest of his life, on one condition: that he quit his job at the post office and become a writer. 49-year-old Bukowski did just that, and in 1971 his first novel, Post Office, was published by Martin’s Black Sparrow Press.
15 years later, Bukowski wrote the following letter to Martin and spoke of his joy at having escaped full time employment.
You can read the letter here.
Via @LaMujerObrera

Letter’s of note: people simply empty out

In 1969, publisher John Martin offered to pay Charles Bukowski $100 each and every month for the rest of his life, on one condition: that he quit his job at the post office and become a writer. 49-year-old Bukowski did just that, and in 1971 his first novel, Post Office, was published by Martin’s Black Sparrow Press.

15 years later, Bukowski wrote the following letter to Martin and spoke of his joy at having escaped full time employment.

You can read the letter here.

Via @LaMujerObrera

2 Notes

How famous writers - from J.K. Rowling to William Faulkner - visually outlined their novels

Writing a novel is confusing work. There are just so many characters running all over the place, dropping hints and having revelations. So it’s no surprise that many authors plan out their works beforehand, in chart or list or scribble form, in order to keep everything straight.

Flavorwire has compiled a number of author outlines, from Joseph Heller’s dense, intricate grid design for Catch-22 to Jennifer Egan’s storyboards for “Black Box” and Norman Mailer’s medieval manuscript of a plan for Harlot’s Ghost. Each outline betrays a little of the author’s mind at work.

Check it out.

2 Notes

We seem to have evolved into a society of mourned and misplaced creativity. Do the maths. We can function - sometimes quite brilliantly - on six hours’ sleep a night. Eight hours of work was more than good enough for centuries (oh the desperate irony that we actually work longer hours since the invention of the internet and smartphones). Four hours will amply cover picking the kids up, cleaning the flat, eating, washing and the various etceteras. We are left with six hours. 360 minutes to do whatever we want. Is what we want simply to numb out and give Simon Cowell even more money? To scroll through Twitter and Facebook looking for romance, bromance, cats, weather reports, obituaries and gossip? To get nostalgically, painfully drunk in a pub where you can’t even smoke?

Find what you love and let it kill you

If you only read one thing today, make it this - a wonderful call to creative arms.

2 Notes

I’d say that, in general, [it’s] gotten worse. But one of the things our report highlights is that people have more tools to resist censorship using new media. For instance, in China, while there’s increased repression in the form of arbitrary arrests, artists held incommunicado and put under house arrest, and increasing hostility towards literature and free expression, there is at the same time a growing willingness of Chinese citizens to find ways to express themselves. In spite of all the repression, there’s been a growth of independent, non-state publishers to print things that wouldn’t be approved by state houses, and people have shown the willingness to post things online even if they’re not to the liking of the state.

Salman Rushdie on the state of censorship in the world.

Full interview.

Via Explore.

Notes

The greedy ghost understands profit all right. But that’s all he understands. What he doesn’t understand is enterprises that don’t make a profit, because they’re not set up to do that but to do something different. He doesn’t understand libraries at all, for instance. That branch - how much money did it make last year? Why aren’t you charging higher fines? Why don’t you charge for library cards? Why don’t you charge for every catalogue search? Reserving books - you should charge a lot more for that. Those bookshelves over there - what’s on them? Philosophy? And how many people looked at them last week? Three? Empty those shelves and fill them up with celebrity memoirs.